Friday, May 31, 2019

Moody's, Standard & Poors Assign Strong Credit Ratings to State of Maines General Obligation Deb

On June 6th, as part of our celebration of Clean Water Week (June 2 – June 6, 2019), the City in collaboration with the Portland Water District is sponsoring a guided walking tour around Back Cove. 

The tour will highlight a few of the many water resources infrastructure features around Back Cove and discuss their significance to clean water, healthy habitats and a thriving Portland. Staff members from Portland DPW Water Resources Division and the Portland Water District will provide their insights into several specific projects and facilities. They will also be available for your questions along the route.

The walking tour will take place along the existing public trail with an additional stop at the East End Wastewater Treatment Plant and the North East Pump Station.  A full loop around the Cove is a little over 3.5 miles. The tour will start at the parking lot on Preble Street, across from Hannaford near the kiosk/map. The tour will start at 1:00 and we anticipate returning to our starting point within approximately 1.5 hours.   

The City has made a significant commitment to clean water and is currently developing a Water Resources Integrated Plan (IP). The IP will help the City prioritize spending with respect to wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and water quality protection. 
A more efficient plan will support reliable City services that residents and businesses depend on. The June 6th tour will demonstrate the types of projects, and the improved environmental and public health outcomes, that such a plan envisions.
Anyone who is interested in hearing about the progress of the plan, and learning how the DPW invests in water and sewer infrastructure, is welcome on the tour. You are also encouraged to visit the Integrated Plan website at www.BluePortland.org for more information and to sign up to receive meeting notices and updates by email.  

Portland to Host June 6th Water Resources Infrastructure Tour of Back Cove



On June 6th, as part of our celebration of Clean Water Week (June 2 – June 6, 2019), the City in collaboration with the Portland Water District is sponsoring a guided walking tour around Back Cove.  The tour will highlight a few of the many water resources infrastructure features around Back Cove and discuss their significance to clean water, healthy habitats and a thriving Portland. Staff members from Portland DPW Water Resources Division and the Portland Water District will provide their insights into several specific projects and facilities. They will also be available for your questions along the route.

The walking tour will take place along the existing public trail with an additional stop at the East End Wastewater Treatment Plant and the North East Pump Station.  A full loop around the Cove is a little over 3.5 miles. The tour will start at the parking lot on Preble Street, across from Hannaford near the kiosk/map. The tour will start at 1:00 and we anticipate returning to our starting point within approximately 1.5 hours.   

The City has made a significant commitment to clean water and is currently developing a Water Resources Integrated Plan (IP). The IP will help the City prioritize spending with respect to wastewater and stormwater infrastructure and water quality protection. 
A more efficient plan will support reliable City services that residents and businesses depend on. The June 6th tour will demonstrate the types of projects, and the improved environmental and public health outcomes, that such a plan envisions.
Anyone who is interested in hearing about the progress of the plan, and learning how the DPW invests in water and sewer infrastructure, is welcome on the tour. You are also encouraged to visit the Integrated Plan website at www.BluePortland.org for more information and to sign up to receive meeting notices and updates by email.  

Absentee Voting Info for June 11 School Budget Referendum Election

Absentee Voting Information For June 11
School Budget Referendum Election


PORTLAND, MaineIn-person absentee voting at City Hall is now underway for the June 11 FY20 School Budget Referendum election. Voting is available during the City Clerk’s office hours -- Monday through Friday from 9:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. This is for any resident wishing to register to vote or vote by absentee ballot.

Due to State Law Title 21-A 753-B (2)(D) there is no absentee voting three days before any election. On Thursday, June 6 only, the City Clerk’s office will extend its hours until 7:00 P.M. This will be the last day for absentee voting in the Clerk’s office and the last day to request an absentee ballot.

On Tuesday, June 11, polls open at 7:00 A.M. and close at 8:00 P.M. Based on your residency, you must vote at your polling place (see list below.)

For more information on requesting absentee ballots, please call 207-874-8677. Voters should visit https://www1.maine.gov/portal/government/edemocracy/voter_lookup.php to locate their correct polling place or visit www.portlandmaine.gov/elections for more elections and voting information.

Rockland Public Library: Preview Screening of Chasing the Moon

Rockland, Maine - July 20, 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing and in honor of this event, the Rockland Public Library will screen a free sneak peek of the documentary Chasing the Moon on Thursday, June 13 at 6:30 PM.  The three part documentary will premiere on PBS’ American Experience on MPBN on July 8 at 9 PM. Chasing the Moon, a film by Robert Stone, re-imagines the race to the moon for a new generation, upending much of the conventional mythology surrounding the effort. The Library will screen the 38 minute excerpt “The Giant Leap.” Following the clip, deputy Library Director Patricia King will lead a discussion and there will be an opportunity for participants to share moon landing reminiscences.

In mid-July 1969, crowds flooded Cocoa Beach in anticipation of the historic launch. Camped out along the beach and gathered in cars, spectators endured the blistering heat in anticipation of the impending launch. At the same time, civil rights leader Robert Abernathy led a peaceful protest, criticizing the priorities of the federal government. Then head of NASA Thomas Pain received them warmly, noting, “We would like to see you hitch your wagons to our rockets” in making their concerns heard by a national audience. Pain invited Abernathy to the launch site, and the protesters joined the thousands of Americans gathered to see the Saturn V launch Apollo 11 into the atmosphere.

On July 20, 1969, the biggest television audience in world history tuned in to watch Neil Armstrong walk on the moon’s surface. The relationship between the press, Hollywood, and NASA reached its zenith as broadcasters produced the first truly global live television experience of the landing. CBS News Director Joel Banow recounts how CBS News even hired a Hollywood special effects wiz to create simulations of the journey so that they would have something to televise until Armstrong and Aldrin were actually on the moon.

Though these first stages of the landing couldn’t be seen live on earth, the Apollo 11 crew proceeded with the difficult undocking and landing maneuvers that should place them safely on the lunar surface. Audiences watched simulations and listened to audio coverage with baited breath as Armstrong delicately maneuvered the lunar module only to discover the landing site was in fact a football-field sized crater, forcing Armstrong to hover the craft and look for a new site with a mere thirty seconds of fuel. At last, audiences heard the triumphant words, “the Eagle has landed.” Mission control responded, “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue – we’re breathing again.”

If you miss the June 13 screening, the Library will also screen the clip on Tuesday, July 2 at 6:30 PM, followed by a discussion. The event, sponsored by Friends of  Rockland Public Library, is free and open to the public. The Library is located at 80 Union  St. FMI: 594-0310.

Eastern Maine Community College Announces 2019 Spring Semester Dean’s List

BANGOR, ME-- Each semester the Academic Dean of Eastern Maine Community College prepares a list of those full time students who have earned a semester grade point average of 3.25 or higher at EMCC. Academic Dean Elizabeth Russell, is pleased to acknowledge the following students:           

City

Name

Atkinson
Calvin A. Andrews III
Taylor H. Smith

Bangor
Marnie K. Allain
Mariah A. Arey
Collin T. Bailey
Aisha P. Banks
Shania L. Bell
Sojourn Bently
Brooklyn H. Brown
Colton S. Chandoha-Lee
Caleb W. Chase
Brett R. Clark
Roland P. Cook
Barrett M. Cote
Emma L. Cousin
Chandler R. Crow
Kaitlyn DeRoche
Nicholas P. Drummond
Miatzilnayeli M. Fairbrother
Thomas A. Fearon
Molly A. Fox
Grace E. Freeman
Kate M. Grafton
Lia C. Hanenburg
William M. Hawkes Jr.
Connor R. Hebert
Mikayla M. Hutchinson
Shellee R. Jordan
Rebecca N. Leavitt
Anna K. Limeburner
Kyle P. McCue
Bradley D. Mitchell
Jerry P. Moors II
George O'Bar III
Jiyeon Park
Jillian K. Parker
Corey A. Pease
Jenna L. Procise
Jaida A. Rahknonen
Ryan M. Robinson
Gabrielle C. Sekera
Jieyon Seo
Rihan E. Smallwood
Hannah Somers-Jones
Michael T. Soteres
Jessica J. Tracy
Kelvin L. Velasquez II

Belfast
Mariah J. Albanese
Shawn D. Kilvin Jr
Brittany M. Steele

Benton
Adam S. Fernald

Biddeford
Samuel S. Roy

Birch Harbor
Ethan W. Preble

Boothbay
Austin E. Campbell

Bradford
Tylor A. Sutherland
Cierra J. Waters

Bradley
Bryan J. Wescott

Brewer
Jacob S. Clark
Benjamin E. Falvey
Jennah J. Geiser
Angelica R. Hartel
Amanda R. Hill
Kayla M. Humphrey
Zachary Kigas
Joshua R. McQuarrie
Taylor J. Nutt
Michael C. Parker
Nickolai Z. Siahaya
Sylwia E. Skowronek
Olivia M. Wing

Brooklin
Duncan C. Kane

Brownville
Derek A. Robinson

Bucksport
Maggie A. Bires
Jeremy M. Cole
Melanie L. Hall
Emily L. Hunt
Mitchell D. Kohls
Michael P. Murphy
Stephen J. Wagner
Cecilia S. Wardwell

Caribou
Casey M. Dobson

Carmel
Kenyon R. Geiger

Charleston
Michaela A. Hill
McKenzie A. Landry
Amber L. Little
Rebecca L. Prescott

Chicopee, MA
Tuong V. Nguyen

China
Kay A. Grady

Clinton
Kerri L. Davis
Courney M. Day

Corinna
Colby N. Pinette
Rhonda L. Shaw
Sierra N. Stafford
Amanda C. Wilson

Corinth
Kassandra L. Bragdon
Katherine L. Bragdon
McKenzie M. Bragdon
Caitlin M. Peary
Lindsey W. Shaw
Eliabeth M. Shumaker
Micah M. Ward

Damariscotta
Andrew B. Larsen-Sorterup

Danforth
Joshua T. Jones

Dedham
Tyler-John Rossignol

Dexter
Forrest R. Fanjoy

Dixmont
Thomas R. Howard

Dover Foxcroft
Thomas A. Stiffler
Caleb J. Woodard

East Winthrop
Luke R. Hussey

Eddington
Zachary J. Bragdon
Andrew W. Cobb

Ellsworth
Emily L. Berry
Andrew S. Davis II
Monica L. Finnegan
Collin K. Lima

Enfield
Brooke J. Thompson
Hannah E. Whitten

Exeter
Lauren G. Chapman

Fort Kent
Jacob L. Kelly

Franklin
Amanda A. Austin

Garland
Bailey D. Bernier

Glenburn
Brian J. Fearon
Lorraine A. Harrigan
Alyson M. Reynolds
Brandy N. Saladin
Raymond T. Valenti

Gorham
Anthony M. Hodge

Greenbush
Noah E. Burr

Greenville
Mackenzie M. Redimarker

Greenville Junction
Coral C. Hinkley

Guilford
Brian S. Moulton

Hallowell
Thomas H. McPherson

Hampden
Mathew P. Daigle
Ryan L. Files
Autumn N. Hunter
Yahya A. Mohamed
Caren M. Mulford
Yosef K. Shteirman

Harwich, MA
Danielle J. Slason

Hermon
Alex M. Bridges
Kendall L. Carpenter Jr.
Krista Crawford
Makayla M. Emerson
Sarah R. Faris
Michael W. Lane
Hannah E. Moody
John M. Oliveira
James D. Plowman
Nathan Raymond
Morgan O. Smith
Jamie St Amand

Holden
George A. Maxsimic III

Holden, MA
Vanessa J. Schirduan

Houlton
Jonathan M. Arsenault
John N. Coleman
Justin B. S. McNally

Howland
Carrie L. Rutan

Hudson
Dustin A. D'Agostino
Amanda Diaz

Indian Island
Chelsea J. Chavaree

Jackson
David Anderson

Jefferson
Oakley D. Oliver

Jonesport
Douglas W. Hinkley

Kenduskeag
Joshua R. Spencer

Kingston, NH
Matthew B. White

Knox
Ivy L. Larrabee

Lagrange
Nicholas Hammond

Lamoine
Keith L. Eaton

Levant

Elise M. McKay
Bryan R. Poland

Lincoln

Zachary A. McIntyre
Chase A. Nelson
Danielle M. Summers
Whitney R. Taylor

Lincolnville Center
Jordan A. Stephens

Machias
Meagan A. Jordan

Mattawamkeag

Grady S. Markie

Medway
Justin Z. Charette

Mexico
Edward Fontaine IV

Milbridge

Donald F. Vincent

Milford
Sean Babin

Millinocket
Jessica L. Pelkey

Milo
Krista L. Dearborn
Faith D. Simmons
Daniel L. Spurgeon

Morrill

Sabrina L. Wood

New Sharon
Caleb Young

Newburgh
Erin L. Young

Newcastle
Lilybeth E. Maiers-Nesbitt

Newport
Dennis Corson

North Anson
Deborah A. Ellis

Northeast Harbor
Haley E. Norsen

Northport
Jacob M. Lowry

Norway
Cathryn A. Davis
Gem U. Haviland

Old Town
Samuel H. Bartlett
Andrew M. Brenna
Lisa R. Cusolito
Allison B. Dionne
Alexandra Fairbrook
Frederick V. Howard II
Marvea R. Jackson
Tempal M. Mailey
Justin D. Morin
Anne M. Norris
Ashley-Lynn M. Ouellette
Matthew M. Pinkham
James H. Sanborn IV
Benjamin E. Weekly

Orland
Clayton I. Doolan
Ian A. Ramsay
Alyssa A. Varnum

Orono
Oluwajoba D. Adeyemi
Stephanie M. Bamford
Ciara N. Jacobsen
Kaylah Kilby
Hunter E. Knowlton
Erin Lanigan
Chloe B. Leida
Morgan A. Stewart
Isaiah M. Wilson

Orrington
Alexis R. Enman
Ashton G. Fogg
Melissa J. Gatchell
Cameron A. Harvey
Samantha V. Johnson
Nicholas Patrick A. Lander
Marissa S. Merritt
Allen-John S. Nygren
Rachelle L. Seward
Juliet R. Watkins

Otis
Jesse J. Kimble

Palmyra
Thomas A. Kelley
Jazmyn P. McLain
Kenneth A. Shakespeare Jr.

Patten
Cooper K. Drew

Penobscot
Lucas R. Brann
Nathan P. Winchester

Pittston
Corey T. Suchar

Plymouth
Mathew B. Neal
Morgan E. Pelletier

Presque Isle
Sydney M. Craig

Robbinston
Joshua T. Stewart

Rockland
Elliott C. Spear

Rockport
Samantha M. Leighton

Rockwood
Robert A. Mello

Sangerville
Harley R. Knowles

Sidney
Allison N. Steinmeyer

Smyrna Mills
Hunter S. Lawlor

Southborough, MA
Benjamin M. Willis

Southwest Harbor
Wilder A. Young

Springfield
KatieJo W. Moore

Standish
Aidan W. Qualey

Stetson
Caitlyn J. DSouza
Sydney E. Frost

Surry
Benjamin I. Tracy

Swanville
James D. Brassbridge

Thornton
Bailey S. Harrington

Topsham
Jason H. Magno

Troy
Thomas J. Haddad Jr.

Turner
Brian C. Johnson

Unity
Lily I. Nickerson
Paxton M. Picard

Veazie
Alexandria L. Aucoin-Scheidt
Charlene M. Buskirk
Sean Kearney
Derek A. Mitchell

Waldo
Collin W. Roberts

Waltham
Arthur J. Jodrey

Waterville
Thao N. Nguyen

West Gardiner
Katelin T. Malinowski

Wilton
Nicholas B. Foy

Winn
Brooke E. Brehaut

Winterport
Miranda J. Cook
Cody J. Romano
Bailey I. Sutherland

Woolwich
Maxwell R. Reed

York
Kelsey B. Elsemore


For more information on the Dean’s List, contact the Academic Affairs office at (207) 974-4601 or email at mboyan@emcc.edu.

June 11: Let's Talk About It Book Club at Thomaston Public Library

Thomaston, Maine - The Let's Talk About It book group, facilitated by author and mentor Lee Heffner, will meet Tuesday, June 11, at 11 a.m. at Thomaston Public Library to begin a new series entitled "Where Am I? The Individual and the Community" with The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

From the Penguin Classics edition:
"In Nathaniel Hawthorne's dark novel, The Scarlet Letter, a single sinful act ruins the lives of three people. None more so than Hester Prynne, a young, beautiful, and dignified woman, who conceived a child out of wedlock and receives the public punishment of having to always wear a scarlet "A" on her clothing.

She refuses to reveal the father of her child, which could lighten her sentence. Her husband, the aptly-named Roger Chillingworth, who Hester thought had died in a shipwreck but was actually being held captive by Native Americans, arrives at the exact moment of her deepest public shaming and vows to get revenge. Her lover, Arthur Dimmesdale, remains safely unidentified, but is wracked with guilt.

Though originally published in 1850, the story is set in seventeenth-century Massachusetts among Hawthorne's Puritan ancestors. In The Scarlet Letter, he created a story that highlighted both their weaknesses and their strengths. His knowledge of their beliefs and his admiration for their way of life was balanced by his concerns about their rigid and oppressive rules."

These discussions are always thought-provoking and lively, and we welcome anyone to join for one book or the whole series! Light refreshments are served.

Next month on July 9, we will discuss Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. Copies are available to borrow at the library. For more information, please contact the library at (207) 354-2453.

The Making of An Arboretum

Event Location: Merryspring Nature Center, Camden/Rockport, Maine

Event Date/Time:  Saturday, June 15, 2019 at 10:00 a.m.

Photo Caption:  Doug Johnson

Merryspring Nature Center will offer a program titled “The Making of An Arboretum,” on Saturday, June 15, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. featuring arborists Nancy Caudle-Johnson and Douglas N. Johnson of Camden-based TREEKEEPERS LLC.

The presentation begins in the educational center, followed by a guided Arboretum walk.  It will address the topics of what exactly constitutes an Arboretum, how are they created, and why they matter, focusing on the Kitty Todd Arboretum Enhancement Project.

In 2016, Merryspring was awarded a Project Canopy planning grant from the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry to fund the renovation and improvement of the Kitty Todd Arboretum.  Merryspring hired TREEKEEPERS to provide expertise and work with Merryspring staff to plan and implement the project.

Arborist Douglas Johnson identified, flagged, and tagged native species trees within the Arboretum area and keyed them to a trail map; located and flagged invasive trees and shrubs for removal identified non-native trees to be removed; recommended native species to plant to augment the collection; and developed maintenance requirements for each of the labeled specimens.

Additional TREEKEEPERS’recommendations included: restoring the scenic Goose River overlook from the wooded knoll; extending the Yellow Birch Trail to the specimen red maple; and selectively thinning trees to increase light availability for labeled specimens.

Merryspring has since installed beautiful new Arboretum signage identifying each specimen and has developed a new Arboretum guide and trail map.  The project was successful in fulfilling its goals to enhance the visitor experience and expand educational opportunities.

In recognition of Merryspring’s successful completion of the Arboretum project, TREEKEEPERS LLC awarded its 2017 Legacy Grant for Tree Preservation to Merryspring to stabilize and maintain the Magestic Red Maple at the terminus of the Yellow Birch Trail – one of the largest red maples in Maine and a signature tree in the Kitty Todd Arboretum.

Multiple Departments Keep Camden Terrace Rockland Garage Fire From Spreading



Rockland, Maine - According to Rockland Fire Department, Knox Regional Communications Center received a 9-1-1 call from a male party reporting a fire within a garage at 10 Camden Street Terrace.  The caller stated that the occupant of the house next door was not answering her door.



First due companies arrived within 4 minutes and Rockland Car 1 reported heavy smoke and flames showing from a garage.  The home was approximately 8 feet from the garage and flames were close to impingement on the residence. A hose line was quickly deployed and water was applied to the fire.  Approximately 1400 gallons of water was used to extinguish, overhaul, and cool hot spots.
The State Fire Marshal’s Office was called to help investigate the fire, along with Rockland Fire and Rockland PD.  
Any factors contributing to, or hindering the success of the operation:
1.  Quick notification to The Knox County Regional Communications Center helped prevent the spread of fire to the house.
2.  A quick response by Rockland Fire & EMS and our mutual aid partners from Camden and Rockport.
3.  Staffed fire stations save time, which saves lives and property.  Our first due companies were arriving on scene, from across the City, in under 5 minutes from being notified.  They had water on the fire in less than 8 minutes.

Date/Time Reported:  05/30/19 with a time reported of 6:19 PM

Address of Incident:  10 Camden Street Terrace  
First Unit/Arrival Time: Rockland Car 1 at 06:23

Apparatus Assigned:  Rockland Tower 3, Rockland Squad 3, Rockland Engine 1, Rockland Rescue 2, Rockland Car 1, Rockport Fire, and Camden Fire
Number of Personnel:  26 Personnel

Cause is under investigation.

*Photo Credit to Alan Athearn, Rockland Fire & EMS Photographer.

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Dharma Walk in Owls Head


Owls Head, Maine - Georges River Land
Trust, in partnership with Rockland Shambhala and The Dancing Elephant, will present a Dharma walk on Thursday, June 6 from 5:45 pm - 7:00 pm at Ash Point Preserve in Owls Head.  Cynthia Trone will lead the walk. Admission is free, and all are welcome to participate.

As in the ancient Buddhist tradition, practicing

outdoors helps us feel and understand our interdependence with the Earth and all sentient beings. Participants need be comfortable with hiking on a moderate wooded path, and are encouraged to wear walking/hiking shoes.

“Each time we practice mindfulness we’re able to generate more love and compassion for the Earth, as well as ourselves,” says Thich Nhat Hanh, author of Love Letter to the Earth. And walk leader Cynthia Trone adds “When we immerse ourselves in nature, our hearts and minds settle into the ease of peaceful interconnection. In the quiet of nature, we look inward for answers to the turbulent environmental crises of our times. We generate love and compassion and feel inspired to help heal our Earth.”

Trone earned her Master’s Degree in Mindfulness Studies from Lesley University in 2017. Her work focuses on the connection of ancient wisdom to modern crises. In 2016, Cynthia travelled to Tibet to better understand the oppression and culture of Tibetan Buddhism, and in 2017, she attended the Dalai Lama’s Kalachakra teachings in Bodhgaya, India. She currently develops and manages youth programs at Georges River Land Trust’s Langlais Sculpture Preserve in Cushing. Cynthia coordinated the Sacred Art Tour’s first visit to Maine in 2018 and looks forward to welcoming the monks of the Drepung Gomang Monastery in Mundgod, India back to midcoast Maine again next year.

Participants are asked to meet at 5:45 p.m. at the trailhead parking lot on Ash Point Drive. From Rockland, drive south on Rte. 73, turn left onto North Shore Drive; turn right onto Ash Point Drive. Go about 2.5 miles and look for the parking lot on the left. If the lot is full, please carefully park along the road shoulder.

Georges River Land Trust is committed to protecting the ecosystems and traditional heritage of the Georges River watershed region. For additional activities and more information, visit georgesriver.org or phone (207) 594-5166. 

PHOTO:
1. Ash Island
2. Walk leader Cynthia Trone

CALENDAR:
Thursday, June 6, 5:45 pm to 7:00 pm, Dharma Walk with Cynthia Trone, Ash Point Preserve, Ash Point Drive, Owls Head. Free. Rain or shine. Georges River Land Trust. FMI 594-5166

Services Provided to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism in their Homes and Communities

Update: May 30, 2019
The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) offers home- and community-based services to adults with intellectual disabilities and autism through two MaineCare-funded programs. These are often called waiver programs because they operate with special waivers from the federal government. In Maine, we refer to them as Section 21 and Section 29, which is where they can be found in the MaineCare rules.

Many community services are available under both Section 21 and Section 29. These include:
  • Home Support, provided in a person's home to assist with eating, bathing, dressing, cooking, laundry, grocery shopping, medication administration, etc.;
  • Remote Home Support, provided through assistive technology such as sensors, cameras, and speakers to monitor or interact with a person;
  • Shared Living, in which a person lives with a care provider in a private home and receives support in needed areas of home life and community inclusion;
  • Community Support, a service to increase a person's ability to engage in community life and social relationships;
  • Employment Support, and other services to prepare for and be supported in employment; and
  • Assistive Technology, which includes assessment of a person's need for technology; purchase, lease or repair of items, and support for internet or cable costs needed to operate the items.
Additional services are available only under Section 21, including:
  • Home Support- Agency Per Diem, a group-home setting where agency staff provide services 24 hours per day, including assistance with eating, bathing, dressing, cooking, laundry, grocery shopping, medication administration, and community inclusion;
  • Specialized Medical Equipment and Supplies, which are devices or equipment not covered as a regular MaineCare service, such as van lifts, ramps, and reclining wheelchairs; and
  • Communication Aids, which are devices or services to assist with communication.
As of May 14, 3,173 people were receiving services through Section 21 and 2,281 people through Section 29. An additional 55 people had offers for Section 21 and 66 had offers for Section 29. This means the funds are available to serve those additional people, and they are currently arranging services.

Under Section 21, individuals are

CMCA to Present "Dan Mills | Human Topographies

CMCA to Present "Dan Mills | Human Topographies"

Rockland, ME, May 29, 2019 —The Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) will present a large-scale exhibition of artist Dan Mills' work beginning June 29 and continuing through October 13, 2019. The exhibition, Dan Mills | Human Topographies, will be the first solo show of the artist’s work in Maine since he moved to the state in 2010. 

Dan Mills makes work that is full of observations about historic and current events. He conducts extensive research on topics such as current wars and conflicts, colonialism, and life expectancy by state, and creates paintings and works on paper that visualize data and information on these subjects.

Mills frequently uses maps as the space to explore his ideas. He began incorporating maps into his work in the early 1990s while researching the quincentennial of what is euphemistically referred to as The First Encounter. Since then, he has explored history and colonization in paintings and collages on large roll-down school maps and in an atlas of future states, the loss of history through erasure and over-painting on maps, visualized data about current wars and conflicts in world maps, and data about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness on U.S. maps.
Mills has exhibited widely, with solo shows in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and at academic museums and galleries throughout the U.S. His work has been included in many group exhibitions including “Crooked Data: (Mis)Information in Contemporary Art”, University of Richmond Museums (2017); “Ideologue”, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Salt Lake City (2016); and “Dissident Futures”, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco (2013-14). His upcoming exhibitions include solo shows at Howard Yezerski Gallery, Boston (2020), and Museum of Art at University of New Hampshire (2020).
Mills has been a frequent speaker, panelist,

Portland Public Library hosts Jaed Coffin in conversation about Roughhouse Friday

Portland Public Library hosts Jaed Coffin in
conversation about Roughhouse Friday 

with Katherine Miles at LiterarLunchy  
Wednesday, June 26 in the Rines Auditorium


Portland, Maine - oin us for a conversation between Jaed Coffin and Katherine Miles to discuss Coffin’s new book Roughhouse Friday.  The conversation will be held on Wednesday, June 26th at noon in the Rines Auditorium.
About the book
While lifting weights in the Seldon Jackson College gymnasium on a rainy autumn night, Jaed Coffin heard the distinctive whacking sound of sparring boxers down the hall. A year out of college, he had been biding his time as a tutor at a local high school in Sitka, Alaska, without any particular life plan. That evening, Coffin joined a ragtag boxing club. For the first time, he felt like he fit in.
Coffin washed up in Alaska after a forty-day solo kayaking journey. Born to an American father and a Thai mother who had met during the Vietnam War, Coffin never felt particularly comfortable growing up in his rural Vermont town. Following his parents’ prickly divorce and a childhood spent drifting between his father’s new white family and his mother’s Thai roots, Coffin didn’t know who he was, much less what path his life should follow. His father’s notions about what it meant to be a man—formed by King Arthur legends and calcified in the military—did nothing to help. After college, he took to the road, working odd jobs and sleeping in his car before heading north.
Despite feeling initially terrified, Coffin learns to fight. His coach, Victor “the Savage,” invites him to participate in the monthly Roughhouse Friday competition, where men contend for the title of best boxer in southeast Alaska. With every successive match, Coffin realizes that he isn’t just fighting for the championship belt; he is also learning to confront the anger he feels about a past he never knew how to make sense of.
Deeply honest and vulnerable, Roughhouse Friday is a meditation on violence and abandonment, masculinity, and our inescapable longing for love. It suggests that sometimes the truth of what’s inside you comes only if you push yourself to the extreme.
About the Authors
Jaed Coffin is the author of A Chant to Soothe Wild Elephants, a memoir about the summer he spent as a monk in his mother’s native Thailand, and the forthcoming Roughhouse Friday, which chronicles the year he won the middleweight title of a barroom boxing show in Alaska. Recently, Jaed has served as the William Sloane Fellow at Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Resident Fellow at the Island Institute in Sitka, Alaska, and the Wilson Fellow writer in residence at Deerfield Academy. Jaed has lectured widely at colleges, universities, and secondary schools across the country on topics of diversity, creativity, and identity.
A regular contributor to Maine magazine, he also serves as the president of the board for the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance. Jaed teaches nonfiction at the Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing Program at the University of Southern Maine, and he also teaches regularly at Bowdoin College and in the University of Maine system. He currently lives in his hometown of Brunswick, Maine, with his wife and daughter.
Kathryn Miles is an award-winning journalist and science writer. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Saint Louis University and took both her Master of Arts and Doctorate in English from the University of Delaware. Miles is the author of four books: Adventures with Ari, All Standing, Superstorm, and Quakeland: On the Road to America’s Next Devastating Earthquake.  Her essays and articles have appeared in publications including Best American Essays, The Boston Globe, Down East, Ecotone, History, The New York Times, Outside, Pacific Standard, Popular Mechanics, and Time. She currently serves as writer-in-residence at Green Mountain College and as a scholar-in-residence for the Maine Humanities Council.  She lives in Portland, Maine.

211 Now Available for Browntail Moth Questions

AUGUSTA – The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC), Maine Forest Service (MFS), and 211 Maine announced today a new way for Mainers to get information about browntail moths. People with questions can now call 211 Maine to speak to a specialist regarding browntail moth biology, management, pesticide options, health concerns, reducing toxic hair exposure, and potential public policy and economic impacts.

This service is available by dialing 211 (or 1-866-811-5695), texting your zip code to 898-211, or emailing info@211maine.org . 211 Maine will serve as a hub for all State of Maine agencies involved in browntail moth issues.

The browntail moth is an invasive species that causes human health concerns and can also impact forests and ornamental trees. Maine and Massachusetts are the only states in the U.S. known to have this moth.

The tiny, microscopic hairs found on browntail moth caterpillars, shed skins, and cocoons can cause a skin reaction similar to poison ivy. Most individuals affected by the hairs develop a localized rash that lasts for a few hours up to several days. In more sensitive individuals, the rash can be severe and last for weeks. Hairs shed by the caterpillar can become airborne and also cause trouble breathing. Respiratory distress from inhaling the hairs can be serious. The rash and difficulty breathing result from both a chemical reaction to a toxin in the hairs and a physical irritation as the barbed hairs become embedded in the skin and airways.

There is no specific treatment for the rash or breathing problems caused by exposure to browntail moth hairs. Treatment is focused on relieving symptoms and eliminating ongoing exposure.

Caterpillars are active from April to late June/early July. Hairs blow around in the air, fall onto leaves and brush in the fall and spring, and can be stirred up during mowing, raking, sweeping, and other activities. Hairs can remain toxic for one to three years in the environment but lose their toxicity over time.

Browntail moth caterpillars are easy to identify. They are dark brown in color with white stripes along the sides and two red-orange dots on the back.

Steps Mainers can take to protect themselves from browntail moth hairs:
  • Avoid places heavily infested by caterpillars
  • Take cool showers and change clothes after outdoor activities in heavily infested areas
  • Rake, mow, etc. when foliage is wet to prevent hairs from becoming airborne
    • Cover face and tightly secure clothing around the neck, wrists, and ankles when working outdoors
  • Dry laundry inside during June and July to avoid hairs embedding into clothing

For more information

Contact 211 Maine for answers to frequently asked questions on browntail moths:

Solon, Replacement of Main Street Bridge

Date: 06/20/2019 
Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM 

Location: Solon Town Office, 121 Main Street, Solon 
FMI-Phone: 2074417362 
FMI-Email: Andrew.w.lathe@maine.gov 

Please join MaineDOT for a preliminary public meeting to discuss the proposed bridge replacement: Main Street Bridge #2504 in Solon carrying Route 201 over Fall Brook.

Representatives of the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT) will be present on Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. to present options for the project, listen to concerns, receive comments, and answer questions from anyone with an interest in the project. MaineDOT is particularly interested in learning local views relative to project consistency with local comprehensive plans, discovering local resources, and identifying local concerns and issues. Anyone with an interest is invited to attend and participate in the meeting.

Accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities. Auxiliary aids will be provided upon advanced request.

Any inquiries regarding this project may be directed to the attention of Andrew Lathe, Project Manager, Maine Department of Transportation, Bridge Program, 16 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333-0016. Telephone: (207) 441-7362 or by email at: Andrew.W.Lathe@maine.gov 
Work Identification Number 022260.00

Federal Project Number 02226000

TTY Users Dial Maine Relay 711