Friday, August 31, 2018

BREAKING NEWS: Firefighters Battling Suffolk Street Rockland Structure Fire

11:45am Update: According to Rockland Fire Department, Responded to the report of a structure fire on Fulton St. Upon arrival found fire sowing from multiple windows of the first floor of a three story two unit building. Fire was extending from the first floor into the second floor via both the interior stairwell and second floor window facing Suffolk St. The crew from A-shift, under the command of Asst. Chief Mikial Mazzeo, quickly stretched a hoseline and directed water into the first floor to reduce the volume of fire and heat, enabling the crew to quickly move inside and extinguish the bulk of the fire very rapidly. All occupants were reported to be outside, which was also quickly verified by firefighters searching the building. Crews from Rockport FD arrived very quickly as they were just leaving their stations from an earlier incident in Rockport. Camden’s crews, Rockland call firefighters and off duty personnel also quickly arrived and were able to assist the units onscene with opening up walls and ceilings to exposed hidden fire and ensure all hot spots were addressed.

It is believed that the occupant who discovered the fire very fortunately was awoken by smoke irritating his airway. Firefighters noted that they found no working smoke alarms present on any floor in unit. It is likely that proper smoke alarms would have given earlier warning resulting in less damage. It also appears the occupant, like a so many, was under the false impression that opening more doors would help limit dangerous conditions, when in fact the opposite is true. The contents involved in today’s residential are made of formed petroleum in the form of plastics or other similar fuels which reach their maximum temperatures much faster and therefore consume much greater quantities of oxygen. In dwellings where the openings are kept closed this rapid consumption of oxygen often leads to “under ventilated” fires which tend to quickly “choke themselves out” moving to the smoldering phase. Where this occurs a residential contents fire can actually put itself out by consuming all the available oxygen. So while conventional thinking would have people opening doors and windows to let the smoke and heat out; leaving and closing the doors behind you is the best course of action, even if there are other people still inside the building. Chances of survival are greater when the fire cannot grow. Even firefighters tactics have recently been updated to reflect the importance of controlling the airflow in building fires.


The rapid arrival of the duty shift along with Rockport firefighters just behind them allowed the crew to bring the fire under control very quickly. Having greater numbers of available personnel on scene quickly allows many more critical functions to occur simultaneously, and our mutual aid system again proved invaluable in ensuring Rockland firefighters were quickly backed up and augmented.

Cause is under investigation by RFD and State Fire Marshal’s Office.

Rockland, Camden, Rockport Fire Departments responded to the fire.

Call came in at 2:49am.

3:05am Update: Fire on first floor knocked down, lots of extension. 
BREAKING NEWS: Rockland, Maine - Multiple fire departments are battling heavily involved Suffolk Street structure fire on Friday, August 31st, 2018 in Rockland, Maine.

Everyone is out.

"Still" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Still" by Doug Mills
Quiet and still as an oil painting come to life American Eagle sits at anchor off Castine Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Thursday, August 30, 2018

"Early Morning" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Early Morning" by Doug Mills
Early morning reflections of Grace Bailey and Mercantile anchored off Castine Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

VIDEO SPECIAL: Sailing On The Victory Chimes The Maine Windjammer Project


Sailing on the Victory Chimes during the Great Schooner Race.


Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Captain Kip Files to retire this weekend After 29 Years!


Rockland, Maine- After 29 years of sailing the Victory Chimes from Rockland Maine her beloved captain Kip Files will retire this Saturday.   
Here is the statement sent out this morning from Captain Kip Files:
"After 29 years of operating the schooner Victory Chimes, Paul and I have found the right person to take the helm and become her next caretaker.
Sam Sikkema  who sailed as mate last Fall has stepped up to be the new face of Victory Chimes.
Captain Sikkema has great credentials. .
He has sailed around the world on a square rigged vessel and has been Captain of a number of large traditional vessels. 
He is the perfect fit. 
Captain Sikkema will be taking over the reins of the vessel at the end of the season. 
This will be Paul and my last season at the helm. 
If you have been thinking of sailing with us come for a sail this summer to meet Sam and to say goodby.  Those of you who sign up and sail this September will receive a limited addition signed print of Victory Chimes done by Donald Demer as a farewell gift. Some great last minute discounts too!
Paul and I want to thank you all for the support and fun we had over the last 29 years. 
The Chimes will  be in great hands so please continue to support the  new “keeper”.
Fare well .  
Capt. Kip Files and Capt. Paul DeGaeta
victorychimes.com
800-745-5651

Sam and Cara the new faces of Victory Chimes"

We wish Captains Kip and Paul all the best.

Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Monday, August 27, 2018

BREAKING NEWS: Rockland Fire, EMS, Police On Scene Of New County Rd (Rt. 1) 3-Vehicle Accident

BREAKING NEWS: Rockland, Maine - Rockland Fire, EMS, Police are on scene of a 3-vehicle accident,  New County Rd (Rt. 1 by E.L Spears) Monday, August 28th, 2018 in Rockland.

Known at this time, 3 transports, Thomaston and Northeast requested with one ambulance each.

Camden Windjammer Festival This Weekend


Camden Maine-  This weekend is the Camden Windjammer Festival a not to be missed event.

Here is the weekends schedule.

2018 Schedule of Events
Friday – Saturday  |  Aug. 31 – Sept. 1

Friday, Aug. 31

9 a.m. — Windjammer Festival Opens
9-9:30 a.m. — Treasure Hunt REGISTRATION
9 a.m.-4 p.m. — Kids Fish Pond and Sandbox
10 a.m. — Radio Controlled Boat Races in the Harbor
10 a.m.-Noon — Treasure Hunt
10 a.m.-3 p.m. — Displays of Maritime Traditions and Crafts
10 a.m.-4 p.m. — Windjammer Dinner Auction
11 a.m. — Lobster Hauling Demonstration
Noon-5 p.m. — Windjammers Arrive in Camden Harbor
3-5 p.m. — Nautical Dog Show
4-5 p.m. — Camden Walking Tour
5 p.m. — Formal Welcome to the Fleet
6 p.m. — Bay Winds North Wind Ensemble Concert
7-9 p.m. — Schooner Talent Show
9 p.m. — Fireworks over Camden Harbor

Saturday, Sept. 1

7:30 – 10 a.m. — Camden Rotary Club Pancake Breakfast (proceeds benefit local charities)
9 a.m. – 5 p.m. — Displays of Maritime Traditions and Crafts
9 a.m. — Lobster Crate Race REGISTRATION
9 a.m. — First Fish Relay Race REGISTRATION
9:30 – 10 a.m. — Camden Fire Department Water Rescue Demo
10 a.m. — Storytelling and Activities for Children
10 a.m. — First Fish Relay Race
11 a.m. — Build-a-Tiny-Boat
Noon – 2 p.m. — West Bay Rotary Club Chowder Challenge (proceeds benefit local charities)
2 p.m. — Lobster Crate Race
3 p.m. — Captains Courageous movie (Public Library)
3 – 5 p.m. — Come Aboard – Schooner Open House
4 p.m. — All Comers Boat Parade
7:30 p.m. — Jonathan Edwards in concert (Opera House)
8-10 p.m. — Harbormasters’ Dance Party

Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

"In The Fog" The Maine Windjammer Project


"In The Fog" by Doug Mills

Maine windjammers, Nathaniel Bowditch, Angelique, Stephen Taber, Lewis R French and Victory Chimes anchored in the fog off Castine Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Sunday, August 26, 2018

Maine 7 Day Forecast


Tonight
Partly cloudy, with a low around 63. South wind 5 to 10 mph becoming west after midnight.

Monday
Sunny, with a high near 84. Northwest wind around 5 mph.
Monday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 65. Southwest wind around 5 mph.

Tuesday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 88. Southwest wind 5 to 10 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.
Tuesday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 69. West wind around 10 mph.

Wednesday
Sunny, with a high near 86.
Wednesday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 69.

Thursday
A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 79.
Thursday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Friday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 71.
Friday Night
Mostly clear, with a low around 56.

Saturday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 70.
Saturday Night
Partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday
Partly sunny, with a high near 73.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

"Reflections" The Maine Windjammer Project



"Reflections" by Doug Mills
Near perfect reflections of the Arctic schooner Bowdoin being hauled at North End Shipyard in Rockland Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Saturday, August 25, 2018

"Hauling Bowdoin" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Hauling Bowdoin" by Doug Mills
Hauling Arctic schooner Bowdoin at North End Shipyard on a foggy morning in Rockland Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Friday, August 24, 2018

BREAKING NEWS: Rollover By Humble Farmer Shuts Down Rt. 131

Saturday Morning Update: Last night at approximately 7:45 p.m. Knox County Regional Communications Center (KCRCC) received a call of a single vehicle rollover on Rt. 131, just south of the intersection of Rt. 73.  KCRCC coordinated the appropriate units to respond.  It was additionally reported that the single occupant was trapped in the vehicle.  

Knox County Sheriff's Deputy Arthur Smith investigated.  Deputy Smith found that Raymond Montgomery was travelling north on Rt. 131 (River Rd.) in St. George when for an unknown reason he veered off the right side of the road he was travelling.  Montgomery struck a utility pole and then head-on into an embankment.  The 2006 Cadillac SUV he was operating rolled up on its front end completely over and came down on its roof.  Montgomery was seriously injured in the crash with lacerations and potential broken bones.  He was transported to Pen-Bay Medical Center and later by Life-Flight of Maine to a hospital in Portland.  It is believed that alcohol is a factor in the crash.  

St. George Fire and Ambulance and South Thomaston Fire assisted at the scene.
Update 8:45pm: Traffic has started to move slow through the area.
Update 8:18pm: St. George transporting one code 3.
St. George, Maine - Rt. 131 is shutdown due to a single vehicle rollover in the area of St George humble farmer on Friday, August 24th, 2018.

Fire, ambulance and sheriff's office on scene.

"Camden Fog" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Camden Fog" by Doug Mills
A blanket of fog settles on Old schooners Merdcantile and Grace Bailey in Camden harbor.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Two Day Apple Festival in Cushing

Cushing, Maine - Georges River Land Trust will present a two-day apple festival on September 27 and 29 at Langlais Sculpture Preserve in Cushing.  The programs are free and the public is invited to attend.

            On Thursday, September 27 from 5 to 6:30 pm at Langlais Sculpture Preserve, legendary John Bunker will present Saving our Apple Heritage. Bunker is known in Maine as “The Apple Whisperer,” or simply “The Apple Guy,” and, after laboring for years in semi-obscurity, he has never been in more demand. Through the catalog of Fedco Trees, a mail-order company he founded in Maine 30 years ago, Bunker has sown the seeds of a grassroots apple revolution.

           Fedco Trees every year takes a selection of rare heirloom apples and attempts to make them less rare. John has scouted and harvested cuttings of "lost" heirloom apple trees all over New England. When he finds one of these missing links, he grafts it onto rootstocks at the Fedco nursery and begins selling the trees a few years later. Bunker estimates that over the past 30 years he has saved anywhere from 80 to 100 varieties from oblivion.

            On Saturday September 29 from 9:30 to 11:30 am Waite Maclin, also known as Pastor Chuck and his Pastor Chuck's organic apple products, will make a repeat performance at Langlais Sculpture Preserve for his annual apple cider pressing.  Maclin’s dream to create the best applesauce and apple butter in the world, originated in his own family's kitchen right down the road in Cushing. Presently he works with the Cushing Community School and their Green Team and is sharing his hand turning his cider press to create Langlais Cider.  Fall oriented activities suited for children will also be available during this Apple Fest morning.

        The Georges River Land Trust is committed to protecting the ecosystems and traditional heritage of the Georges River watershed region. For additional activities and more information, visit georgesriver.org or phone (207) 594-5166.

PHOTO: Heirloom Apples

'Dogs drop a pair in New Hampshire, 4-2 and 6-4

Dalbec RBI in both games/Lopez 2 doubles in the nightcap
Manchester, N.H. - The New Hampshire Fisher Cats (71-55) swept a doubleheader from the Portland Sea Dogs (55-72) on Wednesday night, 4-2 and 6-4 at Northeast Delta Dental Stadium.

GAME 1 RECAP

New Hampshire scored three times in the first inning and never looked back, holding on for a 4-2 win.

Taylor Saucedo (4-3) worked 5.2 innings on five hits and two runs to earn the win. Travis Bergen earned his seventh save by fanning three over 1.1 innings pitched.

Portland grabbed a 1-0 lead in the first inning as Bobby Dalbec doubled home Michael Chavis, who started the rally with a two-out double.

New Hampshire answered quickly against Teddy Stankiewicz (L, 7-12), as the first five batters reached base. Cavan Biggio tied the game with a single and Harold Ramirez delivered a two-run single. Stankiewicz pitched a complete game in the loss, yielding seven hits and four runs.

The 'Dogs closed the gap on a sacrifice fly by Chris Madera in the third, but Max Pentecost hit a two-out homer in the fifth.


GAME 2 RECAP

Deiner Lopez gave Portland a 2-0 lead with a two-run double in the second inning, but New Hampshire scored six unanswered runs and held on for a 6-4 win.

New Hampshire scored three times in the second inning off Trey Ball (3-4) to take the lead for good. Santiago Espinal, Patrick Cantwell, and Andrew Guillotte had RBI hits. Ball, who made a spot start, yielded back-to-back RBI singles in the third to Espinal and Harold Ramirez.

Francisco Rios (1-4) worked two scoreless innings in relief of Josh DeGraff to earn the win for the 'Cats. Rios entered the game in the fifth inning with two on and nobody out. The lefty fanned Michael Chavis and Bobby Dalbec, Luke Tendler grounded out to first base.

Red Sox pitching prospect Darwinzon Hernandez made his Double-A debut for Portland, working the fifth inning. Hernandez hit two batters, walked one, fanned one, and allowed one unearned run.

In the seventh inning, the 'Dogs scored two on Dalbec's RBI single and a passed ball. Dusty Isaacs retired Jordan Betts to secure his second save of the season.

The Sea Dogs and New Hampshire Fisher Cats (Blue Jays affiliate) wrap up a three-game series on Thursday night beginning at 7:05 PM from Northeast Delta Dental Stadium. Lefty Matt Kent (9-8, 3.33) is on the hill for Portland. RHP Jon Harris (10-4, 4.49) makes a start for New Hampshire. Radio coverage begins at 6:45 PM on the WPEI U.S. Cellular Sea Dogs Radio Network. MiLB.TV starts at 6.55.

Portland's final homestand of the year is August 27-30, and tickets can be purchased at seadogs.com or 207-879-9500.

"Sailing" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Sailing" by Doug Mills
Schooners Lewis R French and Heritage sailing off Deer Isle Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

"Cool Summer Fog" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Cool Summer Fog" by Doug Mills
A cool summer fog blankets schooners Heritage and Summertime at the North End Shipyard in Rockland Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

"Fog" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Fog" by Doug Mills
A heavy afternoon fog settles around the Marshall Point Lighthouse in Port Clyde Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

Strong outing by Rodriguez, 'Dogs beat the 'Cats 4-3

Portland, Maine - Eduardo Rodriguez allowed just one hit and struck out eight in four innings and the Sea Dogs (54-70) defeated the New Hampshire Fisher Cats (69-54) 4-3 on Monday night at Hadlock Field.

Making an MLB rehab appearance for Portland, Rodriguez allowed just three baserunners - a double to Jon Berti on a 3-0 pitch and a pair of walks to go along with his eight strikeouts.  The lefty threw 63 pitches (39 strikes).

Aaron Sanchez was also making an MLB rehab appearance and started the game for New Hampshire.  Sanchez allowed four runs (three earned) on six hits in 4.1 innings. He walked four and struck out four.

Portland plated the game's first run in the second inning when Jhon Nunez scored on a passed ball by catcher Patrick Cantwell.

The Sea Dogs added three more runs in the fourth off Sanchez on a pair of walks, a two-run double by Jeremy Rivera and an RBI single by Chad De La Guerra.

Rivera reached base four times with a single, double, and two walks.

New Hampshire began chipping away at the Sea Dogs' leadoff of Dedgar Jimenez, scoring a run in the fifth and sixth on RBI base hits from Bo Bichette and Santiago Espinal.

Bichette picked up his third hit and second RBI with a two-out single in the ninth to score Juan Kelly and make it 4-3 Portland.

Jimenez (8-7) earned the victory by pitching the final five innings in a piggyback start. Jimenez allowed two runs on five hits while walking one and striking out four. Jimenez struck out Forrest Wall with the tying run on first to end the ballgame.

The Sea Dogs and New Hampshire Fisher Cats (Blue Jays affiliate) close out a two-game series on Tuesday night beginning at 6:00 PM from Hadlock Field. LHP Daniel McGrath (2-3, 3.59) takes on RHP T.J. Zeuch (8-4, 3.34). Radio coverage begins at 5:45 PM on the WPEI U.S. Cellular Sea Dogs Radio Network. MiLB.TV starts at 5:55 PM.

Tuesday night is our final Fireworks Show of the season. Tickets are available at seadogs.com or 207-879-9500.

Monday, August 20, 2018

Long thought to be extirpated Unicorn Root found

Unicorn Root [Photo credit: Maine Natural Areas Program]
This summer the Maine Natural Areas Program documented the rare Unicorn Root! About 300 flowering stems were found in a damp field on privately held land in Bowdoin. This showy plant has not been seen in Maine in over 130 years and was thought to be extirpated. It is known from only three herbarium specimens, two of which were collected by Maine botanist Kate Furbish (Wells in 1879, Brunswick in 1874), and the third from near Lewiston in 1887.

Unicorn Root, also known as White Colic-root or Colicroot, ranges across most of the eastern United States and Ontario, though it is rare in most of the northeastern states and in Ontario. It grows in open, moist, sandy ground and is typically associated with tallgrass prairie habitats and damp, sandy meadows with little to no topsoil.

Unicorn Root has a basal rosette of lance-shaped leaves, and a single, tall flowering stalk with white flowers that appear in June through August. The scientific name (Aletris farinosa) is in reference to the unusual rough, grainy texture of the flowers. The species name (farinosa) means ‘floury’, and the genus name (Aletris) comes from the Greek word for grinding grain (the Aletris was the servant who ground the grain).

The Rockland Report August 15, 2018


OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE
 During the past month Rockland Police Department Officers responded to 914 calls for service, investigated 33 traffic accidents and conducted 90 motor vehicle stops. As a result 86 people were either arrested of summonsed for various violations.
 Members of the Patrol Division continue to conduct targeted traffic enforcement details. Some of these details are grant funded while others are not and are incorporated into daily shift activity. These details include; seatbelt enforcement distracted driving, impaired driving and speed enforcement. These details are conducted and various locations throughout the city.
 Two officers have recently been assigned to the department’s bicycle patrol unit. Officers Addison Cox and Scott Redmun were added to this unit to replace vacancies that have occurred through promotions and retirement. When staffing levels permit, the bicycle patrol units are deployed to enhance community engagement and to augment routine vehicle patrols.
 The department is preparing for the upcoming school year. Increased traffic details will be conducted in school zones and officers will be more visible at the schools throughout the day.
 Officers continue to provide security escort services to financial institutions while they service their automated teller machines.
 Officers continue to conduct alcohol compliance checks are various establishments in Rockland to ensure these locations are in compliance with state laws and city ordinances.
 Officer Cox completed Mechanics of Arrest and Control (MARC) instructor school at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy. Officer Cox now has the knowledge and ability to train Rockland PD officers in the latest techniques in applying physical force to arrest a resisting person. These techniques make it safer for the officer and the person being arrested.
 Officer Rolerson is currently in week 1 of the 18 week Basic Law Enforcement Training Program at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy.
 When staffing levels permit, evening shift officers are patrolling Main St. on foot and checking business to make sure they are secured.
 Detectives in the Criminal Investigation Division continue to investigate open criminal investigations. The detectives are also busy working with other local, state and federal partners on investigations that come in to Rockland.
 Detectives continue to provide a variety of training programs for local businesses and health care professionals in a variety of topics including; signs of human trafficking, theft prevention, robbery response protocols and sexual assault response protocols.
 Administrative staff continues working with RSU 13 in creating a school resource officer policy and memorandum of understanding.
 Administrative staff is working with other local law enforcement leaders, health care professionals and addiction recovery resources in creating a community collaborative which mirrors the very successful model used in Lincoln County. The primary focus of this collaborative is to address the
opiate addiction crisis in Knox County.
 Administrative staff has been meeting with RSU 13 administration, Rockland Fire & EMS, the Knox County Sheriff’s Office and the Knox County Emergency Management Agency for a comprehensive re-write of a district wide school safety plan.
 Administrative staff is attending peer to peer recovery meetings. The purpose of this is to break down barriers between law enforcement and people struggling with addiction. The goal is for people struggling with addiction to see law enforcement as a resource to recovery and not an obstacle to it.

OFFICE OF THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR
 The Silent CafĂ© has moved to Thursdays. Jesse Ellis continues to host this Silent (Sign Language) Social Hour-- a place for people to learn the basics of American Sign Language and about Deaf Culture. This is a voice-off environment; finger spelling is taught and encouraged.
 A variety of scenes and themes were created in Catinka Knoth’s Art classes for adults and children, including classic a Maine lighthouse, Maine coastal scene, and the Rockland Breakwater. I did a walk-through of the building with Officer Bagley, who will return and meet with Library staff.
 We had the shades in the Quiet Room repaired, and are appreciative of Public Services staff for the drop-off and pick-up, as well as of the dead light bulbs they replaced. Barnes Custom Window Treatment did a great job, in almost no time. Huge thanks to Public Services staff for taking the (large quantity of) surplus tax forms for recycling, and for putting up the tent for the Friends’ Annual Tag Sale!!
 The Otis technician performed inspection of the elevator, Superior Restoration Services did a thorough cleaning Children’s Room, and Eastern Fire took care of a dry valve replacement, due for failure.
 After a less-than-10 second power outage, the AC would not power back up. Mechanical Services, responded the next morning and fixed the issue, but also discovered a leak from the fire protection pipes immediately above one of the power units. Eastern Fire patched this, however, the pipe will need to be replaced
 Jessie Blanchard and Katie Drago hosted a STEM Workshop--Homemade Instruments. In honor of the Libraries Rock! Summer Reading Program, they helped kids to make a pellet drum, a colorful paper plate shaker, a Popsicle stick kazoo, and a noise maker called Chicken in a Cup
 Wednesday Storytimes continue, with Judith Andersen, still enjoying her volunteer time with this weekly event. Visits with a therapy dog are back! After Wednesday Storytime, Naomi Howe and her therapy dog, Scottish Deer Hound, Gypsy visited, and will continue this on a weekly basis.
 The Wednesday Walkers Club continued; Jessie Blanchard, Katie Drago, and Patty King alternate as walk leaders. Part of the Checkout Movement & Healthy Living @ the Library series, walkers of all ages and abilities are invited to meet at the Library every Wednesday morning to go on a 30 to 45 minute walk around town. The Checkout… series is funded by grants from the Maine Public Library Fund and the Rose and Samuel Rudman Library Trust, Friends of Rockland Public Library, and the Library (City).
 Also from the Checkout Movement Easy Going Yoga with Antonia Small continued though the end of July. Based on the response, and the need to limit the number of participants due to space, we are considering adding an additional yoga series.
 The Lego™ Club, led by Lego™ Master Jon Newton met the third Thursday of the Month.
 Jean Young invited kids to the Children’s Room to make Lobster Hats they could wear at the Big Parade! Jean mentioned she has noticed an increased number of tutoring sessions conducted in the Children’s Room, at least a couple of groups on a daily basis.
 Our first Blood Drive in March was such a success, we hosted another! Jessie coordinated with the Red Cross, to make this a successful event. Jessie also hosted Coloring Club, trained a new YA volunteer, held two Tech appointments for teaching smartphone functions, and created a number of non-fiction weeding lists.
 Ukulele lessons with Frets Halligan (part of The Arts for Kids & their Families @ the Rockland Public Library series continued through the end of July, and was a very popular program
 The July Catching up with the Classics Book discussed The Scarlet Pimpernel. New members are always welcome; members select the book for the succeeding month.
 Kathryn Jensen from the Knox/Lincoln 4-H presented a program on exploring rocks, minerals, and gems! And find out what minerals can be found in your backyard.
 Patty King attended a City Safety Committee meeting, participated in the radio show Love My Library on WRFR, and met with one new library volunteer, who will be covering hardcover books. Patty also met with Emily Jeffries of the Good Tern Co-op to plan our upcoming collaborative "Waste Reduction" Week.
 More than 80 people attended the Lawn Concert: Mes Amis, an infectious mix of traditional Gypsy, Latin, and American jazz for all ages. Led by guitarist, vocalist and composer Steve Lynnworth - and featuring Shane Ellis on clarinet and saxophone, Harry Richter on rhythm guitar and Wells Gordon on upright bass. One audience member played along on “air guitar,” and “air bass.”
 Other Thursday evening Community Events programming curated and hosted by Patty, included the screening of the documentary, Still Tomorrow. A village woman with no high school diploma becomes China's most famous poet, and her book of poetry the best-selling such volume in China in the past 20 years. The film weaves her personal narrative with that of an ascendant, urbanizing China, and presented as a collaboration with POV, PBS' award-winning nonfiction film series. Patty was the presenter for a Checkout Movement… series event, where she shared the wonderful world of smoothies and discussed a variety of smoothies (including green and vegan) and their benefits. Participants tasted and made their own smoothie blends and took away recipes, as well. As a follow-up, Patty ran into two different participants in the grocery store the next day, shopping for ingredients!
 Teresa coordinated the Books on Wheels homebound delivery service, pulling items from our library and/or requesting items from interlibrary loan for our homebound patrons, and checking out and bagging items for the Friends volunteer to pick up and deliver on Fridays. She also set up home delivery for a new patron.
 Katie continued hosting Baby Time on Thursday mornings. She reports that we have created a community of happy babies and guardians sharing stories. Katie also continued Rockin’ Storytime, which included themes of Owls! They read silly and sweet stories and learned how to do an owl dance. Another day was kittens! Katie read another of her favorite stories and the whole group
did a great job with a long, black & white book. All danced and are getting really good at freezing during the Silly Dance Contest.
 Katie also reports that Potterfest was phenomenal! Wizards entered the party by passing through the Platform 9 ¾ entrance. Inside was a photo booth, a make- your-own wand station, Potter brainteasers, Pin the Lightning Bold on Harry (a favorite), 2 crafts, and two sports. They cheered on all ages playing the sports together. Dozens of wizards helped to return the Norwegian Ridgeback dragon eggs to the Romania sanctuary in Dragon Ball. Then they tried their hands at
being Chasers in Bean Bag Quidditch. Every attendee made their own unique brand of magic wand.
 Three Wizards Friends’ members and staff presented Storytime at the Farmers’ Market; thanks so much to Jim and Jeanie Schaden who put up and take down the tent each Thursday—we couldn’t do this without their gracious help. Readers included Eileen Spectre and her granddaughter Maggie, Patty, and Jeanie Schaden.
 Our oh-so kind and talented volunteers for this period include Sarah Lawson, Pat Niedzielski, Jane Ryan, Hugh Ryrie, Brook St. Laurent, Deborah Sealey, Katie Syrett, and Chris White, and we are very grateful for their contributions.
 The Summer Reading Closing Party featured the Gawler Family Concert. Prizes were awarded and ice cream served after the concert. All who participated in the children’s Summer Reading Program went home with a bag full of prizes. The top readers from adults, teen, & children’s programs were entered into the bike raffles, for one of the 10 bikes generously donated by the Masonic Knox Lodge #189.
 Some of the winners of the 10 bikes donated by Knox Masonic Lodge #189
 Jessie hosted the Adult Summer Reading Finale--a Coffee Party with coffee/tea and snacks in the Board Room. Attendees were invited to talk about the books they read or listened to, and win more prizes!
 During July, the Library served 12,735 patrons and held 63 programs with a total attendance of 1202.
 Upcoming events include a Library Tour--Which President spoke from the Library lawn? What does the library keep in that big safe? Whose busts are watching over the Reading Room? Join librarians Patty and Jessie to learn the answers to these questions and more! Also, Astrophotographer Mike Taylor, Co-sponsored with Bartlett Woods.

OFFICE OF THE FIRE/EMS CHIEF
Over this preceding week, in addition to the response to 197 Fire and EMS calls, conducting apparatus checks, daily cleaning, routine repairs and maintenance to the fleet and of the quarters, the following occurred:
 Training provided over the last month:
 EMS training on Cyanokits and our new med swap procedures at PenBay Medical Center. We are working with the hospital to find common ground ono a new policy for medication exchanges.
 Fire training was wrapped up with Foam applications and we began a “Know Your City” program. FF Shook has coordinated building tours, downtown pre-plans, and streets/hydrant reviews for our members.
 Notable Meetings attended by Management staff:
 Chief Whytock attended the following meetings:
1. Emergency Plans meeting with RSU 13 and public safety staff
2. Code/Informational meeting with Region 8 Staff
3. Safety Meeting at City Hall
4. Local Emergency Planning Committee
5. Various other safety/planning meetings
 Special Events /News
 Professional Vehicle Corporation has been awarded the bid for a new ambulance. R-2 is a 2009 Ford chassis which will be replaced with a 2019 Ford F-450. We have been very happy with our Dodge chassis rescues but received word a few months ago that Dodge will be scaling back its production and have made it almost impossible to line up a new rig.
 A bid opening for our new Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus was held and we came in well under budget. The funds come from our successful FEMA grant along with a 5% City match.
 Rockland is now a part of Wardens Report, which allows citizens to obtain a burn permit FOR FREE online www.wardensreport.com . The system is designed to only issue permits on days where the fire class day is below the allowable threshold. You will still be able to come to the station and get a hand written copy for free as well. Both permits clearly state what can and can’t be burned and when you are allowed to burn. If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to call and speak to the duty officer at the fire station.
 Notable Calls Responded To: (Although our job affords us the opportunity to do amazing things (most of which we can’t talk about), these calls have made headlines.
 RFD responded to a report of a building fire to a local restaurant downtown. First due companies found recently laundered towns had been dried and folded tightly against one another and the subsequent heat build-up caused them to ignite and begin to burn within the building. The grease within the towels is what helped fuel the combustion process. Thankfully there was very minor damage within the laundry room and the business was back open the next morning.
 A-shift responded to a boat fire on Mechanic Street. Crews found that the large bumpers between the dock and the boats hull. About 400 gallons of water was used to extinguish the blaze with no extension into the boat.
 Safety Note:
 We have seen a few instances where the fire alarm panels in buildings are being accessed by residents or workers and alarms are being silenced or reset prior to our arrival. This is actually against Fire Code and City Ordinance. No alarm can be silenced, reset, or tampered with WITHOUT permission of the Fire Chief. Please keep this in mind.
 If you are having issues with a smoke or Carbon Monoxide detector, feel free to call us and we can assist you. Don’t remove a detector and not replace it with a functional one.

OFFICE OF THE WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITY DIRECTOR
 Scheduled SIU yearly inspections.
 Continued investigation to determine the source of debris and rags being flushed down the sewer and causing pump problems at the Industrial Park pump station.
 A consulting engineer hired by the insurance company visited the treatment plant to inspect the damaged secondary clarifier.
 Two employees visited treatment plants in Falmouth and Portland to view different types of clarifier technology that might work better at the Rockland treatment plant.
 Continued working with Wright-Pierce Engineering on planning and design of upgrade projects to be done at the treatment plant and in the collection system with funding from the approved sewer bond.
 The lab has been conducting sampling and testing of the water in the vicinity of the Beach at Chickawaukee Lake since cases of swimmers itch were reported earlier in the summer.
 Employees from this department and students from Oceanside High School Marched in the Lobster Festival Parade with a float they built to represent the department and the city.
 Made arrangements to accept septic waste from the navy vessel that was visiting Rockland during the Lobster Festival.
 Worked with programmers from Woodard and Curran to troubleshoot and correct a problem with the control programming for the aeration blowers.
 The South Main St. Stormwater separation project was advertised for bids on August 14.
 The dry weather this summer is causing extremely low flow through the treatment plant. To maintain proper treatment one primary clarifier and one aeration basin have been temporarily taken off line.
 Responded to numerous Dig-Safe requests from other utilities and contractors.
 Inspected sewer service lateral repairs and replacements done by various contractors.
 Cleaned sewer mains on Lovejoy, Valley View and Sweetland streets.
 Did weekly inspection and testing of the ten pump stations.
 Performed preventative maintenance on various pieces of equipment throughout the treatment plant.
 Continued summertime grounds keeping and maintenance around the treatment plant and pump stations.

OFFICE OF THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
 $830,000 grant award from US EDA for Rockland Fish Pier Redevelopment. We have secured the balance of funding needed for Rockland Fish Pier Development. Thanks to the Harbormaster for his help with the application.
 $210,000 grant award - CDBG. Our CDBG grant application on behalf of Bixby & Co. to help with expansion of their operations was successful.
 CDBG. Attended a mandatory 2-day training for Community Development Block Grant administrator certification.
 Committee support. The Musson Group has been retained to assist the Harbor Plan Committee with its work.
 Business assistance and outreach (Jul 9-Aug 13 ). This month’s proactive outreach included lunch with a representative of DST Systems, and conversations with two retailers and one restaurant which may be good fits with Main Street over time.
 Also assisted businesses and residents with a variety of questions, requests and concerns:
o 12 existing businesses assisted
o 3 potential businesses assisted
o 5 residents assisted
 Growth challenged by lack of available land. One observation from business assistance and outreach over the past several months is that the lack of land available for commercial or light industrial growth and expansion is a risk. There are existing businesses who want to expand and have nowhere to go, and potential businesses who tell us they can’t find suitable locations. With that in mind, if the City wishes to expand its tax base, it may be desirable to consider whether there are opportunities for additional land to be included in commercial or business park zones.

OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERVICES DIRECTOR
 Work continues on the Transfer Station Building Upgrade Project. One of the existing compactors was pulled out of the Transfer Building, sandblasted, repainted and will be placed back inside the building once the concrete work is completed.
 Prep and drainage work for the Limerock Street Rehab project was done by the Public Services crew from Old County to Ulmer.
 All States Asphalt began their prep work for the Limerock Street Rehab Project and the pavement reclaiming on Aug. 7th. The first stages of paving will begin on Aug. 16th.
 The Bid Opening for the Annual Paving Contract was held on July 24th and there were five bidders. The bid was awarded to Performance Paving of Owls Head.
 The bridge on Thompson Meadow Road replacement is almost ready to go out to bid. The goal is to have the project done prior to the end of this construction season. The City secured a grant from DEP to assist with a portion of the cost.
 Attended DEP meeting in Augusta regarding the Landfill Closure on Aug. 2nd.
 Preparations and clean-up for the Maine Lobster Festival.
 Preparations and clean-up for the Maine Boats, Homes & Harbor Show.
 The bi-annual application and supporting documents were sent to the Maine DEP for reimbursement of Landfill Closure Costs incurred during the first half of 2018.
 MDOT LRAP eligibility documents completed.
 Ditching is being done on the Bog Road.
 Sports Fields, Inc. of Monmouth replaced the bases and landscaped the playing field at Jaycee Field on Old County Road.
 Preparation for planting of donated trees.
 Work continued on the Atlantic Street Sidewalk. Two sections have been poured and stamped.
 Attended FEMA reimbursement meeting on July 20th.
 Attended the Parks and Recreation Committee Meeting.
 Weekly sample collections for Maine Healthy Beaches water testing.
 Continued repairs and maintenance at the Library and City Hall.
 Fence repair was done at Mildred Merrill Park.
 Replacing and placing new signs throughout the City.
 Weeding was done along curbs and sidewalks.
 Overnight crosswalk and stop bar painting is ongoing throughout the City.
 Ongoing cold patch is being done City wide.
 Ongoing City wide street sweeping
 Ongoing City wide trash removal
 Ongoing City wide basin cleaning
 Sewer report for the month of July was sent out.

OFFICE OF THE HARBORMASTER
 The City of Rockland was recently awarded the last grant we applied for to rehabilitate the fish pier. Total project funding is just over $1.6M. Target construction start date is fall of 2019 to finish spring of 2020.
 All festivals have come and gone, the Public Landing is open for all!
 If you are late with annual mooring permit payments, please contact the Harbormaster.
 We have a new Harbormaster Facebook page, we are trying to update as things come up to keep people informed.
 New Cruise Ship guidelines are in effect for any cruise ships that make new reservations as of 14 Aug 2018.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV

There is Still Time to Enroll in Lincoln Theater’s Classic Film Club

Damariscotta, Maine - The enrollment period for membership in Lincoln Theater’s second season of its Classic Film Club, closes on Saturday September 1st.  Lincoln Theater’s Classic Film Club comprises folks who enjoy classic movies, from the 20s to the 80s, and the experience of enjoying them again on the big screen.  Members choose most of the films, and the screenings, held in the Damariscotta theater's historic hall,  are open to the entire community



Membership, at $45 per person includes: Participation in selecting the films; Admission to 6 screenings; Small popcorn and water at each film; Glass of wine/beverage at each film;

and more special surprises.



For season two, the Classic Film Club has expanded by adding an additional Thursday night showing. Screenings take place early each month on Thursday eve and Friday mat.  The dates for the 2018-19 season are: Thu Oct 11 at 7 PM / Friday Oct 12 at 2 PM, Thu Nov 1 at 7 PM / Fri Nov 2 at 2 PM, Thu Dec 6 at 7 PM / Fri Dec 7 at 2 PM, Thu Jan 3 at 7 PM / Fri Jan 4 at 2 PM, Thu Feb 7 at 7 PM / Fri Feb 8 at 2 PM, Thu Mar 7 at 7 PM / Fri Mar 8 at 2 PM.



As the Godfather said, “I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse.” Applications for the Classic Film Club can be found on the theater’s website, www.lcct.org, or at the theater office.  Additional information and applications can also be requested by sending an email to info@lcct.org.

"Summer Fog" The Maine Windjammer Project


"Summer Fog" by Doug Mills
Summer fog at the Marshall Point Light in Port Clyde Maine.



Photos provided by Maine Windjammer Project
The Maine Windjammer Project started in 2007 to preserve the modern history of the Maine Windjammer and to make it available to the generations to come.
This historical archive is available to museums and for historical research.
For more info contact: dougmills@shootmainestudios.com


WATCH MAINE POSITIVE TV